Welcome to the Northampton Community Garden!

FAQ

Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions

Question: What if I’m not sure I’ll be able to garden next year?
Answer: Send in your registration form without a check, explaining the situation. We’ll hold your plot(s) until March 1, with no penalty for lat registration.

Question: How do I request more plots?
Answer: Returning gardeners have priority in signing up for available plots. There is a limit of four plots per household.

Question: What if I can’t pay the registration fee by the January deadline? Answer: Send in your registration form without a check, and enclose a note saying when you’ll be able to pay the fee. We’ll hold your plots until then, with no late fee.

QUESTION: How do I request more plots?
ANSWER: On page 4 of these forms you’ll find space to indicate that you wish to add plots or give them up. Returning gardeners have priority in signing up for available plots. There is a limit of four plots per household.

QUESTION: How is it decided whether a request for a plot is granted? ANSWER: The Garden Committee tries to meet all requests. A request received earliest has priority. If more than one gardener asks for a particular plot, the Committee tries to find equally desirable plots for each. If this isn’t possible, a coin toss decides.

QUESTION: How do I qualify for a $4 composting credit?
ANSWER: a. Indicate on the registration form that you wish to claim the credit. b. Have a compost pile in your plot – you need only one compost pile, even if you have more than one plot – by June 1, and maintain it during the gardening season. c. Indicate the existence and boundary of the compost pile by posts, a wire enclosure, pallets, or some other means. Your pile does not have to be elaborate. A few stakes driven into the ground outlining a square or circle, with the compostable material inside, is OK. A circle of chicken wire wrapped around four stakes makes a neat and inexpensive enclosure. You may also use a plastic composter, although these are better suited to residential areas; aeration is difficult, and the enclosed area may play host to flies and maggots. Your pile need not be large. For efficient composting, a pile four feet square and four feet high is a good idea. This takes up 16 square feet, about 4% of the total area of a single (20’ x 20’) plot. We will offer composting workshops at the Garden and articles in the Newsletter to provide more information.

 

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